The evolution of brand management

Brand management has evolved. No more paternalistic brand, speaking to its consumers. The shift from traditional broadcast communication to a two-way model, the decline in the effectiveness of paid media and the subsequent increase in the importance of acquired media signifies a huge transformation in the way marketers approach management. of the brand. In a world where marketers are mere gatekeepers of the brand, how can they expect to develop it successfully?

It goes straight to the heart of the brand’s behavior. It’s not just about what he says. It’s about how he acts. Brands are becoming more open, more collaborative. And it means a shift in approach for brand managers, not only in the new, well-documented skills required of modern marketers, but also in mindset.

Cultivate trust using collaborative campaigns

In retaliation for the view of many marketers that loyalty is an unachievable ‘good to have’, we believe that effective brand management requires a culture of trust, born out of genuine behavior and leadership. ” collaboration with the people who will buy their products and services. According to Erik Schoppen’s Build, Bridge, Bond methodology, to survive the era of the connected consumer, brands today must adhere to three fundamental marketing principles: purpose, promise and engagement.

Goal

People see brands as personalities with their own identity. The goal of a brand is to demonstrate what it stands for and why it does things the way it does. Purpose is the most controlled of the three principles, in which marketers establish a brand personality which in turn determines branding.

Promise

This describes the benefits of the product and the value it will add to the lives of consumers. Traditional marketing persists in telling us what we want. The danger here is that as consumers we feel called upon rather than heard. No one knows what we want anymore than ourselves, so the brands of the future need to be open to listening to consumers and creating products and services that people really want as opposed to what brands decide they have. need.

Participation

It is an uncontrolled environment for brands, where people decide for themselves what the brand represents, how products are used, whether and how they communicate about the brand and whether in a positive or negative way. . Participation is crucial for brand image because it is synonymous with openness, honesty and authenticity; key traits to develop trust in any relationship.

Participation in the brand takes several forms:

  • A conversation between friends
  • A recommendation
  • A user-generated content item
  • Mass awareness through word of mouth campaign
  • Activation of the social buzz for a large-scale comeback
  • Co-creation projects that help shape new product development

It’s by working together that people can see the intent and the ideas behind what brands are trying to do. In the process, the collaboration creates mutual respect between brands and the people who shop from them. He harnesses the brains and skills of thousands of people to build the brand. It creates a psychological connection: we are not only inclined to stay loyal to the brand ourselves, we are proud of it and we want to share it. We have a deeper property of the product. We have an interest in the brands we love.

Of course, the three principles are not isolated, but rather connected in a continuous cycle of intersections, each of which feeds the next. To evolve, brand management must bridge the gap between your promise and the customer experience by delivering exceptional experiences at all touchpoints, and embrace those beyond your control. Create lasting relationships by involving consumers, listen to, recognize and act on suggestions for improvement from them and facilitate the dissemination of honest word of mouth to reinforce the goal.

The successful brands of the future will allow and seek meaningful, two-way dialogue. They will thrive on the genuine and sincere recommendations given back. They will not have clients as such; instead, they will have a community of co-marketers built on mutual trust and loyalty, as dedicated to growing the brand as the business itself.

In this exciting new era of brand management, the brand team is no longer the custodian of brand content and concepts. They are the custodians of innovation and ideas conceived by their own communities.

Learn more about how the marketers of tomorrow will grow their brands by restoring consumer confidence in their brands.

Cathy W. Howerton